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help- seeking info.-help.
Jul 21, 2002

What are the chances of getting HIV/Hep. from exposure to urine that may have accidently been exposed to mucous membranes(tongue)

Response from Mr. Kull

There is no known risk of HIV transmission through contact with urine in or on your body. HIV cannot always be isolated in urine, and if it is, HIV concentrations are too small to pose a threat of infection. Some conditions contribute to blood being present in a person's urine, which would contribute to a risk of HIV transmission if the person who emitted the urine was infected.

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus that can be transmitted through urine. Many people are not adversely affected by infection with CMV. In some cases, CMV infection can lead to a mono-like illness, which usually resolves on it's own. Certain groups are at high-risk for more serious CMV-related complications: the unborn baby during pregnancy, people who work with children, and immunocompromised people, such as organ transplant recipients and the HIV infected.

Hepatitis B is present in bodily fluids such as semen, vaginal secretions, blood, saliva, and urine. Mucous membrane contact with a hepatitis B infected person's urine could pose a risk for transmission.

Other infections of the urogenital tract could theoretically pose a risk of infection to you when you get urine in your body. Microorganisms that "live" in the urethra (like those that cause gonorrhea or chlamydia) or others that might be present in genital fluid (like hepatitis) could be carried out by urine and into your body. Mucosal contact (the lining of the mouth or rectum) with these organsisms could pose a risk for infection, but again, there isn't a whole lot of proof to support this.

RMK



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