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How to take off condom?
Mar 26, 2002

Hi Dr,

After pulling out penis out of vagina, the condoms is covered with vaginal secretions. What's the correct way to take the condom off? I used to take it off directly, sometime with a tissue. But some safe sex web pages suggest peeling the condom off the tip of penis slowly. Which way prevents the secretions touching the lining of urethra? Am I too obsessed ? Thanks.

Response from Mr. Kull

First of all, it is highly unlikely that you would become HIV infected if your penis came into contact with vaginal secretions from removing the condom. HIV is known to be transmitted through intercourse (vaginal, anal, and oral) and not from other activities associated with sexual contact. The fluid contact is likely to be minimal and pose no risk for infection.

Still, it's great that you want to be cautious. So here are some ways that you could remove a condom to prevent you or your partner from coming into contact with the other's fluids:

1) Grab the base of the condom (where the ring is) before you completely pull your penis out of your partner. Don't wait until you lose your erection, as the condom may slip off your penis as it loses its size.

2) Carefully peel or roll the condom off of your penis starting from the base of the condom. It's okay if you get fluids on your hands; just wash them with soap and warm water before continuing in any sex play.

3) Throw away the condom after you use it. Flushing a condom down the toilet can clog it, so skip that.

4) Don't reuse the condom.

If you follow these steps, use plenty of water-based lubricant, and the condom doesn't break or slip-off, then you've done a great job at protecting yourself from infection.

RMK



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