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CAN
Nov 20, 2000

So, this question may be a bit vague....recently i was having a lot of burning pain while urinating and some bumps on my vaginaand tons of redness and sorenes...i went to the doctor and he diagnosed me with HSV-2...i went to my one and only sexual partner and he said he'd never been diagnosed with HSV-1 (we only had oral sex) and neither had any of his previous lovers contracted HSV-2. I went for a second opinion only tohave them tell me they thought I did not have HSV-2..but possibly warts. I have always had skintags on my body...is it possible to get skintags vaginally? i have then on my thighs and neck, etc..and I am overweight, and since skintags Occur where there is friction on the skin i think this may be possible. I have examined myself and they look exactly like skintags and my lover has no signs of warts on his mouth or fingers.neither of the doctors can agree and i can't find an answer anywhere...do you know?

Response from Mr. Kull

Yours is a complicated situation and demonstrates the difficulties and nuances of identifying sexually transmitted dieseases. It is an art form, at best. That's why I recommend that people get second opinions and see clinicians who have more experience dealing with and diagnosing STDs. Herpes and warts can sometimes be elusive diagnoses since so much relies on the clinician's observation and not laboratory tests. However, I am little surprised that you got such different responses: herpes and warts should be easy to differentiate by a skilled clinician.

Herpes sores should be cultured and tested by a physician. A positive culture or EIA/DNA test is pretty definitive that you have herpes. A negative culture or test is not as definitive because the tests frequently fail at detecting actual infections.

It's possible for a person to have herpes or HPV and not be symptomatic. You are much more likely to be infected through active lesions, but there's a small theoretical possibility that you could be infected when someone is asymptomatic. Therefore, what your partner says is only partly helpful.

If you are still having active sores, try getting yet another opinion and get cultures/tests. Look for specialists. If your symptoms have subsided, the best you can do is wait to see what happens and get frequent gynecological examinations. It's possible that you will not have a recurrence of these symptoms.

RMK



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