Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  Breaking News: FDA Approves Triumeq, New Once-Daily Combination Pill
   
Ask the Experts About

HIV Drug ResistanceHIV Drug Resistance
           
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


Viral Replication
Jun 3, 2007

I am confused about viral replication. The current antiretiroviral drugs prevent replication. However, when the meds are stopped is the virus still present in the infected cell and able to start replicating again?

Response from Dr. Sherer

Yes to both questions. The current antiretroviral drugs are 'static' drugs, i.e. they don't kill the virus, but they do prevent replication. Fortunately, the consequences of stopping replication are prolonged length of life and a dramatic reduction in the serious clinical consequences of HIV infection, i.e. opportunistic infections and conditions. We are able to measure the degree of virus replication reduction with the plasma viral load; when it is below the level of detection, i.e. < 50 copies/ml (or whatever the lower limit of detection is for the assay that your doctor uses), the best and most durable outcomes of ART are observed. Note that not all of the many HIV-related clinical consequences are stopped or delayed by ART, including some HIV-related cancers, and HIV-associated central nervous system disease.

When the drugs are discontinued, viral replication inevitably resumes, as you suggest, and, over time, the CD4 cell count will fall again by an average of 100 cells/year, and, if enough time elapses, HIV-related opportunistic infections will again occur.


Previous
Lifelong suppression
Next
Resistance test conflicts

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


 
 
Advertisement




Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement