Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
   
Ask the Experts About

HIV Drug ResistanceHIV Drug Resistance
           
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


CBS News news on new drugs
Nov 20, 2004

Hi,On the CBS News new website on AIDS, they have some interviews with Doctor Fauci and Ho who say many things, inlcuding the great news that there are some new integrase and fusion drugs that will overcome resistance which will be available in the next few years. This sounds exciting! Are we really that close to new types of fusion and integrase drugs? Will these drugs be easier to take than Fuzeon/T-20???

Response from Dr. Sherer

It is true that the latest generation of drugs that block the entry of virus into cells by a variety of mechanisms are making progress in clinical trials. Large scale trials are in planning for the most advanced compounds. It is also true that they have some advantages over T-20, most notably being available for oral dosing rather than injections.

It would not be correct, however, to say that they can 'overcome resistance' of the virus to current HIV medications, as they have a completely different mechanism of action. NRTI, NNRTI, and PI resistance mutations will not be affected by this class of drugs.

It is true, however, that their use may help to overcome the problem faced by people who have had many ART regimens and are highly resistant to the current classes of drugs.

Also in the pipeline are new agents in the existing classes (NRTIs, NNRTIs, and PIs) that have activity against these same multi-resistance viruses. At the recent ICAAC and Glasgow conferences, the results of the major trials of tipranavir, a new protease inhibitor with activity against multi-PI resistant strains, were presented. In about one third of patients, full viral suppression was accomplished after 48 weeks of treatment with tipranavir (in combination with the booster ritonavir 200mg twice daily) and intestigator-selected new NRTIs. Importantly, those patients in whom Fuzeon (T-20) was also used, i.e. in whom there were 2 active classes of drugs, including one new class (T-20), had the best results in the US trial, with almost one half of patients having full viral suppression.

Tipranavir is likely to be approved on the strength of these data in 2005, and available for compassionate release as well.


Previous
Forgot to take one med
Next
Meds

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


 
 
Advertisement




Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement