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lipid test and cure
Aug 31, 2013

what can I do to increase my HDL known as the good one? (High-density lipoprotein cholesterol)I've tried different ways to increase it including everyday jogging 8kilometers but still at 35,the normal range is 40-60. my cholesterol ,LDL,Triglycerides all are in the normal range level. 2,,assuming scientist finally come out with a HIV cure,can those that started with aids diagnosis irrespective of their CD4 numbers at the moment benefit from the cure? can they still have those side effect during their ARV intake or all will subside,includes lipid,diabetes,etc ? can CD4 itself increase back to normal range like negative people? thanks for your kind

Response from Mr. Vergel

HIV lowers HDL (high density lipoprotein- the good cholesterol).

When we start HIV medications, HDL tends to go up.

Out of all the medications studied, Sustiva (Efavirenz) increases HDL the most compared to others.

Exercise, high soluble fiber intake, niacin, and lipid lowering agents can increase HDL.

Nutritional Guide to Increase HDL

It is hard to predict who will be the first group to benefit from the cure. But we can speculate that those who started HIV meds close to the time of infection will have a better chance at a cure due to their smaller HIV reservoirs. But this is an speculation that will greatly depend on the cure method (or combination of approaches) used to get to a functional or sterilizing cure.

Some HIV+ people have increases in CD4 counts that closely resemble those of healthy HIV negatives. Those who start treatment at higher baseline counts have a better chance of doing so. But I have seen people with baseline less than 50 cells that have gone up to 800 in a matter of two years. They are rare but they are out there.

Some of us never regain a "normal" level of CD4 counts (over 500 cells/ml) even after years of starting HIV meds. I am one of them. But we remain healthy for the most part although we may have a higher risk for complications like cancers, etc. It is impossible to predict who will have more complications than others as we age. But at least we can chose to take care of ourselves to minimize additional risks.

Keep taking your medications on time, exercising,eating well and staying productive. Those are factors under our control that can make a huge difference in our life span and quality.

In health,

Nelson



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