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megace to gain weight
Dec 3, 2010

i am a healthy person weighing 80 but height 6 feet so i want to use megace to gain body weight please do tell me the way to achieve my goal

Response from Mr. Vergel

I would use whey protein shakes plus three meals plus resitance (weight) training instead.

Megestrol is a progesterone based product used in the treatment of advanced cancer of the breast and endometrium. When given in relatively high doses, Megestrol can substantially increase appetite in most individuals, even those with advanced cancer. It is also used to boost appetite in individuals with other cancers or HIV/AIDS.

Megace us the worst drug to use for weight gain. It increases mostly fat mass, hyperglycemia, risks of blood clots and joint bone death.

Here is a chapter of my book "Built to Survive" about the Megace:

Megace The Wrong Drug

By James Brockman (Reprinted with permission)

One of the most commonly used drugs for treatment of AIDS-related weight loss is megestrol acetate, which is sold as the brand name Megace by Bristol-Myers Squibb. Megace is a synthetic drug categorized as a gestagen, which is a class of drugs that mimic the actions of the naturally occurring female hormone progesterone. Originally the drug was developed to be an injectable contraceptive for women, but the drug has now found a role as a chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of several cancers in women and men, such as cancers of the breast, uterus, and prostate. Two commonly observed side effects of Megace, increased appetite and weight gain, prompted its current use for AIDS-wasting.

The effects of progesterone and other gestagens, like Megace, on appetite and energy metabolism, are well known. Gestagens induce increased food intake by direct stimulation of the appetite centers in the brain. They also improve the efficiency of food energy used to produce new tissue; this effect of gestagens on increasing weight is seen even when gestagen-induced increase in food intake is prevented by restricting calories to maintenance levels.10 So much for the good points.

What Kind Of Weight Gain?

The problem with the weight gained from Megace is that it is primarily fat and water weight, with little lean tissue increase. , Through interactions with mineral corticoid receptors in the kidneys, specific metabolites of Megace promote retention of water. In addition some studies have shown that Megace increases the number of fat cells as well as their size. This is exactly what someone who is wasting or have lipodystrophy doesn't want. We should be clear that the focus of just putting weight on HIV(+) individuals is inappropriate. Studies are conclusive that survival is correlated with lean body mass, not total weight or fat weight. So if you want to be fat and hungry, take Megace, but do not expect to gain much muscle or live any longer.

Many Side Effects

Megace has almost too many side effects to list. For both men and women the most commonly observed side effect is loss of libido. When Megace was used as a female contraceptive, it worked too well. All the women lost their fertility, but they lost their normal sex drive too! Megace interacts with the progesterone receptors in the hypothalamus to inhibit gonadotropin release in both sexes. Gonadotropins stimulate testosterone production, and testosterone is necessary for a healthy sex drive in both men and women. The end-result of lower gonadotropins in men is not only lower testosterone production, and lower libido, but also testicular atrophy. In other words, the testicles shrivel up. Finally, low plasma testosterone levels are bad for HIV(+) men and women because they are associated with a weakened immune system and the loss of muscle tissue.

Because Megace and/or its metabolites have glucocorticoid activity, 9 Megace is also potentially immunosuppressive. Glucocorticoids are well known to inhibit proliferation of white blood cells including T cells, and weaken the body's response to infection, as well as slowing the healing process. Furthermore, a glucocorticoid responsive element has been identified in the RNA of the HIV virus, so it is possible that Megace could have a direct effect on stimulating viral replication. Other side effects related to the cortisol-like activity of Megace are glucose intolerance, full-blown diabetes, and suppression of the hypo-thalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis.9 Resist-ance to cortisol is common in HIV, and with-drawal from Megace therapy could result in a dangerous state of adrenal deficiency. These conditions are associated with the later stages of HIV in cytokine-related wasting, so it makes little sense to use a drug that has the potential to make the complications of HIV infection even worse. Other problems seen with Megace include thrombosis (blood clots), carpal tunnel syndrome, and peripheral neuropathy.

Conclusions

When it comes to gaining muscle to rebuild a body weakened by AIDS, Megace cannot begin to stack up to anabolic steroids. While some people assert that Megace has a role as an appetite stimulant, there are other substances, like Marinol, that work with far fewer side effects. If your doctor is not yet aware of the benefits of Marinol and anabolic steroids and the problems associated with Megace, work to educate them, and be sure to ask questions if they tell you they would like to prescribe Megace for you. After all, your choice of therapies is up to you.

Nelson



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