Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: TheBodyPRO.com Covers AIDS 2014
   
Ask the Experts About

Choosing Your MedsChoosing Your Meds
           
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
Recent AnswersAsk a Question
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


AIDS diagnosis
Mar 21, 2013

Hi I was diagnosed with AIDS and KS in August 2012 and was immediately put on HAART (Truvada/Isentress). My CD4 was only 7 that time but now it has moved up to only 58 (Feb test). My viral load is now undetectable from 300,000 in August.

I am a bit worried over this slow increase but generally I feel healthy except for mild fever occasionally due to KS inflammation. I was put on chemo in August for KS and still undergoing treatment.

The good news is that I dont take drugs, dont smoke and am taking my medicine on a regular basis. What is my prognosis? Are there any chances I can live long with such a low CD4 ? Seriously seek yr advice on this.

Response from Dr. Young

Hello and thanks for posting.

While you were diagnosed with HIV/AIDS and a precariously low CD4 cell count, it seems like you're on the way to recovery and health.

For "late presenters" like you, it can take longer to heal the immune system damage caused by HIV, but do know that with time, recovery can happen. Indeed, your continued adherence to your medications and maintenance of an undetectable viral load are the best predictors of a good long-term prognosis. Your health risks will remain present (though decreasing) until your CD4 count rises above 100-200, or so and you should make sure to stay engaged in your health- and mental health care.

What we do know about people who do achieve normal (>350) CD4 cell counts and suppressed virus is that we can now anticipate essentially normal life expectancy- large study groups recently have confirmed this point. So, there are good chances of a long and healthy life.

So, hang in there, keep up with the adherence and stay in touch. BY



Previous
3 months and 3 weeks, after exposure and PEP.
Next
Switching from Efivarenz & Lamzid to Atripla

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary

 Get Email Notifications When This Forum Updates or Subscribe With RSS


 
Advertisement



Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement