Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  Breaking News: FDA Approves Triumeq, New Once-Daily Combination Pill
   
Ask the Experts About

Choosing Your MedsChoosing Your Meds
           
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
Recent AnswersAsk a Question
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


Atripla, HIV and Heart Disease
Feb 9, 2013

Hi:

I've been undet. for 17 years w/meds, currently Atripla. My Cd 4 is around 900. I'm 59 and otherwise healthy.

Does Atripla increase the risk of heart disease? Also, is being + an independent risk factor for heart disease even when a VL has been undet for so long? Does the virus still cause inflammation in the body? My hs-crp is 2.2 and homocysteine is normal.

I'd like to stop lipitor because of side effects. I have no other risk factors but have been told that taking Atripla and being pos are independent risk factors for a heart attack.

Thank you.

Response from Dr. Young

Hello and thanks for posting.

There's a lot written about HIV and heart disease- first and foremost is an important understanding that untreated HIV is definitely a risk factor for heart problems. Being on treatment with an undetectable HIV viral load reduces this risk significantly.

The medications in Atripla (tenofovir, FTC and efavirenz) are not thought to be significant contributors to heart disease, per se.

The fact that you're taking a statin drug like Lipitor suggests to me that your lipids (cholesterol and triglycerides) are probably elevated; if you're having side effects from the Lipitor, you should speak to your doctor about them and explore whether there are other alternatives.

Overall, the goal is to decrease your risk of cardiovascular disease- this risk isn't just HIV or HIV medications, but also the net sum of other factors- including your genes (family history), medical history of diabetes or high blood pressure, whether you're over weight, smoke or don't get aerobic exercise. Also be mindful that men between age 45 to 79 years are recommended to use low-dose aspirin when the potential benefit of a reduction in myocardial infarctions outweighs the potential harm of an increase in gastrointestinal hemorrhage- these are widely known, but poorly adhered-to medical recommendations- you'd might well qualify for this simple intervention.

I hope that helps, BY



Previous
saint john's wort - valerian and meds for hiv
Next
Can i return to truvada after using Kihexa for a month?

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary

 Get Email Notifications When This Forum Updates or Subscribe With RSS


 
Advertisement



Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement