Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  Breaking News: FDA Approves Triumeq, New Once-Daily Combination Pill
   
Ask the Experts About

Choosing Your MedsChoosing Your Meds
           
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
Recent AnswersAsk a Question
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


ARV's and Alcohol
May 17, 2009

Hi Dr McGowan,

I have said it before and will say it again, the information that yourself, Ben, Nelson and Mark provide is invaluable in providing reassurance, guidance and support to those like myself with the virus and those doing their best not to join the club. Quite often the advice elsewhere online is not clear, often contradictory and rarely up-to-date, so thanks again. Okay, about 5 months ago when I was going through a severe depression I was drinking heavily for about 2 months (I mean heavy!), so my question is will this have affected my long term response to HAART? I am still undetectable. My second question is related to the first to some extent; how long does it take for a problem to show up in terms of viral rebound after an incident or incidents? For example, if my alcoholic binges had reduced drug absorption, would this have resulted in viral rebound around the same time or some months (or even years later)? The same question goes for missed doses. The anxiety is that past mistakes get somehow archived and viral rebound occurs later therefore a current undetectable result doesn't reflect the damage done and that will eventually manifest later. Finally, I still like to go out and socialise and sometimes this results in a heavy drinking session. Does acute episodes like this affect the performance of ARV's? Okay, cheers and take care, Michael.

Response from Dr. McGowan

Hello Michael Thank you for your questions and compliments. Heavy drinking can have two effects. Acutely, one could get alcoholic hepatitis or acute inflammation of the liver. If the acute inflammation does not progress to liver failure, there is usually a recovery of liver function. The chronic impact to excessive alcohol intake is cirhossis of the liver and eventual liver failure that usually requires a liver transplant. The liver dysfunction seen in cirhossis can have an impact on the metabolism or breakdown of medications that use the liver for this purpose. The metabolic impact may increase the toxicities seen with certain HIV drugs. Excessive alcoholic intake may cause nausea, vomiting and inflammation of the lininig of the stomach (or gastritis) and this may make tolerating an HIV regimen more difficult. The long term impact of missed doses of antiretrovirals depends on whether it leads to viral rebound or growth. A virus that is allowed to replicate or grow in the presence of drugs at suboptimal doses increases the chance of viral mutations that could confer drug resistance over time.



Previous
YOU CAN BE THE BEST DOCTOR OVER THE WORLD BUT YOU DO NOT HAVE THE RIGHT TO UNDERESTIMATE THE NATURAL SUPPLEMENTS
Next
Switching Meds

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary

 Get Email Notifications When This Forum Updates or Subscribe With RSS


 
Advertisement



Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement