Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
   
Ask the Experts About

Understanding Your LabsUnderstanding Your Labs
          
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
Recent AnswersAsk a Question
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


Difficult (but important) question about different techniques to sequence the virus
Dec 2, 2006

Hi Doc,

I understand Brian Conway's team (University of British Columbia) picked up an atypical case of HIV by sending a plasma sample for resistance test, even though the patient had negative ELISAs 12 and 14 months after exposure, negative bDNA, negative DNA PCR and a negative co-culture with PBMCs. See http://www.thebody.com/Forums/AIDS/SideEffects/Archive/Testing/Q156332.html. Brian Conway,M.D. explains that as part of this process, the resistance test sequences the virus using a technique that is quite different from Roche PCR and bDNA.

My very basic understanding is that PCR technology is used in the viral load assay and the genotypic resistance test. However the resistance test then requires further technology to determine the DNA sequence of the PCR product that was generated.

I would be FOREVER GRATEFUL if you would advise me how precisely/else the resistance test is different from Roche PCR and bDNA.

Response from Dr. Holodniy

This is too complex of a question to answer here. You are correct that PCR is used in the first step of the genotyping resistance assay followed by a sequencing reaction to determine the DNA sequence that uses different biochemical steps. PCR is not used for the bDNA assay.



Previous
CD4 & VL
Next
CD% very high

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary

 Get Email Notifications When This Forum Updates or Subscribe With RSS


 
Advertisement



Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement