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2nd. Labs what do they mean?
May 20, 2006

Hi Dr. My first labs on April 5th. were CD-4 =282 CD4% =25 Virat Load 10,288

My 2nd. set of labs on May 11th. CD-4 = 315 CD4% = 28 Viral Load 15,877 I'm not on meds currently. My question is since this is an upward trend in both CD-4 count and % should I wait 3 months to have another set of #'s done to see if the upward trend continues? Is my viral load considered low and is it normal for the viral load to increase yet the CD4 count and CD4 % to also go up? I would have thought if the viral load goes up the CD-4 goes down. Also I hear people say if your CD4 % is a certain # then that should equate to a given CD4 count. So what should my CD-4 count be with a CD4 percentage of 28 and is it possible to get it to that level without meds? Thank you very much.

Response from Dr. Holodniy

All those numbers would be considered essentially the same and therefore unchanged between the two time points. Your absolute CD4 count is slightly low for the given percentage. For instance a CD4 count of 200 roughly equates to a percentage of 14%, below which is considered an AIDS diagnosis. Your viral load is in the low to moderate range. You can certainly afford to wait for another set of tests. The best way to increase your CD4 count is to get HIV treatment. If your viral load is undetectable, your CD4 count would probably be > 500.



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