Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
Read Now: Expert Opinions on HIV Cure Research
   
Ask the Experts About

Understanding Your LabsUnderstanding Your Labs
           
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
Recent AnswersAsk a Question
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


Recently Infected, Doctor Confused
Dec 17, 2005

I was infected with HIV sometime in August 2005. The reason I am so certain is because I have a paper trail that documents a "negative" HIV result to "positive". Plus, I was going to participate in a clinical study, and some test was performed to ascertain relative timing of infection. 1st "positive" result was 9/13 with the Red Cross nucleic acid test and antibodies test.

My HIV specialist is surprised by my lab results, particularly viral load. From 9/05 to 12/05, my CD4 has ranged from 465 to 654, improving over time. My viral load ranged from 316 to 146, steadily falling over time.

I believe my doctor was expecting a VL between 500 and 5000. However, my body seems to be controlling the virus. Because my VL is so low, I cannot participate in the intended clinical study for recently infected patients.

First, are these values really that uncommon, espcially VL? Moreover, when I was first diagnosed (before any labs) I was told that most recently infected people do not need meds for 4-7 years. If this is the case, wouldn't the VL need to start off very low? Finally, with 4 months of CD4/ VL tests, in your opinion, would you think I am potentially a slow progressor?

I'm having a hard time trying to decide what are "normal" CD4 and VL values for recently infected patients.

Thanks

Response from Dr. Holodniy

Uncommon, but certainly seen. It is hard to predict who will need meds and when. Everyone has their own set point numbers. There is no "normal" in this case. Some people can have very rapid progression after infection and require treatment sooner. It is too soon to talk about rate of progression.



Previous
Slow Progressor?
Next
Viral load question

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary

 Get Email Notifications When This Forum Updates or Subscribe With RSS


 
Advertisement



Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement