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I am scared
Feb 15, 2002

Dear Dr Feinberg. I am a freshman and I met a young female student at a local bar. It was my first experience and I kissed her body but I did not put my tongue into her mouth at all. She did take my penis out and sucked it for a short while. I felt dirty and I came to the dorms and thoroughly washed myself. I was scared and I went to a doctor who gave me a course of antibiotics. He sent me for some blood test about 14 days after the incident. It all came ok. I then found myself having blurred vision, feeling dizzy and unsure about myself. I have a constant pain around my chest and at the back of my head. I have been an active athlete but now I am unable to do so. I feel as if I am short of breath. My eyes are painful. I do not know how to approach my parents. I just cannot wait another 2 months. Please help me. I have been reading every response on your site.

Response from Mr. Kull

Ryan Kull from the Transmission and Prevention forum here:

Receiving oral sex is considered to be a very low risk activity. In the course of tracking modes of HIV transmission throughout the epidemic, there has been no evidence that people get infected through receiving oral sex. This is because the saliva of HIV infected people is not likely to be infectious.

The saliva of infected people contains little to no virus, and the virus that is found in saliva is often inactive (not infectious). Studies have found that a protein in saliva inactivates HIV (up to 90% of virus was inactivated in one test tube study) and other factors that may contribute to the noninfectious quality of saliva. This is why transmission through kissing or receiving oral sex doesn't seem to occur.

You sound pretty upset about the sexual experience that you had. First sexual experiences can be difficult for many people, and can bring up a lot of new, complicated feelings. It is important that you have people in your life that you can talk with about sex, so that you don't have to experience your confusion in isolation. If you have difficulty finding support, consider talking with a professional counselor about your feelings.

RMK


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