Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
  Breaking News: FDA Approves Triumeq, New Once-Daily Combination Pill
   
Ask the Experts About

Hepatitis and HIV CoinfectionHepatitis and HIV Coinfection
           
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
Recent AnswersAsk a Question
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


HIV/HCV coinfection
May 13, 2013

Dear Dr Taylor,

Thank you for your recent reply. I have been reading about Hep C treatment, here and in other sites, and must say thatI feel very confused: On one hand it seems that the strategy regarding newly HCV infected people is to wait to see if the Hep C infection clears by itself. On the other hand, there are opinions that starting treatment during the acute phase is recommendable, as the chances of success are greater than in chronic HepC. So would it be logic to conclude that treatment should start as soon as possible instead of waiting for a "probably" spontaneous Clarence, whilst the chances of successful treatment are higher? In my particular case, I fear that the 8-12 weeks wait may take me in the chronic phase, thus reducing the chances of a good response to treatment. What approach would you take? Thank you Paco

Response from Dr. Taylor

If your doctor can pinpoint when you were infected, then waiting 12 weeks from this timepoint to see if you spontaneously resolve infection is the standard of care. If you do not get rid of the infection on your own after 12 weeks, you and your doctor can consider hepatitis C treatment. You do not lose anything by waiting the 12 weeks but there are risks to getting treated with medications when you did not need the medications.

I appreciate that it can be hard to wait these few weeks. During this time it can be helpful to get prepared in case you DO start hep C medications. Get things ready regarding your work if you work, sleep, exercise, healthy diet, stopping alcohol and tobacco if possible else at least cutting down, taking other medications and considering other health issues. Make sure you talk with your doctor or a trusted health professional to understand why you caught hep C, and how to prevent getting infected again. Make sure you were tested for other infections that go along with hep C, such as HIV and syphilis. Wishing you the very best.



Previous
Hepatitis c genotype 1a treatment
Next
posble cntamination of hepa b

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary

 Get Email Notifications When This Forum Updates or Subscribe With RSS


 
Advertisement



Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement