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HIV viral load
Aug 2, 2009

1.)When I was first diagnosed with HIV in 2006, my viral load was 527,000. Is this normal or is it on the high side? 2.)Just a few months ago, I had a western blot performed and the results were negative. What could possibly be the reason for this, or should I take my blessing and run? lol. 3.) What are the dangers of having HIV and how could it affect me with day to day living and my sex life?

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hi,

1. It is never "normal" to have a detectable HIV plasma viral load, because it is not "normal" to be HIV infected. For those who are "virally enhanced" a viral load of 527,000 is high, however, counts can go up into the millions.

2. Why did you have a Western Blot test a few months ago if you were diagnosed HIV positive in 2006? Most likely the Western Blot test (if this was the only test run) was a "false negative." Western Blot tests should only be used to confirm a repeatedly positive ELISA (or other type of screening HIV-antibody test).

3. The dangers of having HIV??? Hmm . . . where have you been for the past 28 years? Untreated HIV is a progressive terminal disease caused by a retrovirus. It has prematurely snuffed out the lives of over 25,000,000 people worldwide. The virus slowly destroy the host's immune system leaving the host susceptible vulnerable to a wide range of opportunistic infections and malignancies. HIV and its associated conditions can cause a wide array of symptoms prior to death. As for your sex life, HIV is a sexually transmitted disease. I would suggest you review the wealth of information on this Web site. You obviously have lots of catching up to do. Begin with the "HIV Basics" chapters that can be easily accessed on The Body's homepage. You should also establish ongoing care with an HIV specialist physician as soon as possible.

Good luck. Get informed and get the care you need, OK?

Dr. Bob


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