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Fatigue and AnemiaFatigue and Anemia
           
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Fatique Early On...
Feb 16, 2004

I've been infected about 6 months now. My most immediate concern is the fatique I am experiencing. Sometimes I can't even sit at a computer for longer than 20 minutes without going to lay down. As I have read through the site, the question and the answers, I see this question get answered frequently. However rarely do I see the cause actually get attributed to fatique. It could be this, it could be that, it could be anything, and it could be HIV. What I am wondering is this fatigue a normal symptom of being HIV+. I have been depressed before. I have used drugs before. I have experienced fatique before. But never I have I experienced this level of fatique that I literally can't not lay down. Is this normal as a symptom of HIV? Or is it something I should see a doctor about. It seems I can never ever find a concrete answer to ANY question I EVER ask. I am beginning to wonder if anyone actually knows anything about this depression. =/

In the Dark

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hello In the Dark,

I'd say it's time to turn some lights on! Fatigue in the setting of HIV disease is extremely common and often has more than one cause. So yes, it could be this, it could be that, it could be HIV. Is it "normal?" No, it's common, but not normal. Sure, sometimes it's easy to diagnose. For instance, you could be anemic. Once that's determined, instituting the proper treatment say iron or vitamin supplements for nutritional anemias or Procrit for AZT-induced or chronic disease anemia will get your batteries recharged. However, often "fatigue" isn't easily diagnosed like an ear infection or strep throat. It may take several visits to your doctor and some collaborative detective work to figure out what is wrong and what to do about it. You can't do detective work if you remain "in the dark." So "curtain up, light the lights, you've got nothing to hit but the heights!" (Gosh, my life is becoming a Broadway song.)

I would also strongly advise you to see a therapist to evaluate a psychological component to your fatigue. Your last statement is very telling . . . "I am beginning to wonder if anyone actually knows anything about this depression."

Good luck.

Dr. Bob


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