Advertisement
The Body: The Complete HIV/AIDS Resource
Follow Us Follow Us on Facebook Follow Us on Twitter Download Our App
Professionals >> Visit The Body PROThe Body en Espanol
   
Ask the Experts About

Fatigue and AnemiaFatigue and Anemia
          
Rollover images to visit our other forums!
  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


Good Dr. Handsome You Made a Mistake
Jan 20, 2003

Hi Doc Handsome

I know you don't want to answer WW questions, but your recent post that the CDC states that if someone has had sexual contact w/ a KNOWN HIV+ person should test 6-12 months is wrong. The CDC has revised it's guidelines in 2001 and now state that such an exposure warrants a 6 month test otherwise 3 months is sufficient. Below is the quote from the CDC

"Most infected persons will develop detectable HIV antibody within 3 months of exposure (126). If the initial negative HIV test was conducted within the first 3 months after exposure, repeat testing should be considered >3 months after the exposure occurred to account for the possibility of a false-negative result. If the follow-up test is nonreactive, the client is likely not HIV-infected. However, if the client was exposed to a known HIV-infected person or if provider or client concern remains, a second repeat test might be considered >6 months from the exposure. Rare cases of seroconversion 6--12 months after known exposure have been reported (134). Extended follow-up testing beyond 6 months after exposure to account for possible delayed seroconversion is not generally recommended and should be based on clinical judgment and individual clients needs (54).

PLEASE POST because there is propably a few Worried Wells freaking out right now, and if they (WW's) think they are going to be the lucky ones to convert after 6 months they should buy lotto tickets cause their chance of winning the lotto is greater than testing +

Response from Dr. Frascino

Hi,

Sorry for the confusion. I was referring to the exact recommendation you referred to, particularly the part, " . . . if the client was exposed to a known HIV-infected person or if provider or client concern remains, a second repeat test might be considered at 6 months from the time of exposure. Rare cases of seroconversion 6-12 months after exposure have been reported. Extended follow-up beyond 6 months after exposure to account for possible delayed seroconversion is not generally recommended and should be based on clinical judgment and individual client's needs." I personally believe the 6-month test is conclusive in the vast majority of cases; however, since the CDC mentions "6-12 months" for the "rare cases," I felt I had to include that; otherwise, I would have received tons of letters from folks accusing me of not giving the accurate CDC recommendations. And they probably wouldn't be so nice as to call me "Good Dr. Handsome!" Bottom line - I totally agree with you. Thanks for writing. Stay well!

Dr. Bob


Previous
Hello again Dr. Bob, Just a note to let you know
Next
you probably think my question is stupid...

  
  • Email Email
  • Glossary Glossary


 
Advertisement




Q&A TERMS OF USE

This forum is designed for educational purposes only, and experts are not rendering medical, mental health, legal or other professional advice or services. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, mental health, legal or other problem that requires advice, consult your own caregiver, attorney or other qualified professional.

Experts appearing on this page are independent and are solely responsible for editing and fact-checking their material. Neither TheBody.com nor any advertiser is the publisher or speaker of posted visitors' questions or the experts' material.

Review our complete terms of use and copyright notice.

Powered by ExpertViewpoint

Advertisement